Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Why I am most certainly unconcerned over charges of racism

Racism is a sin. Yet, the charge of systemic racism and the supposed problems of racism in America struck me as odd. I self-identify as a Christian first and foremost. Culturally, I consider myself Singapore Chinese, not "Asian." My ancestors did not take part in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and thus I think that qualifies me as a third party.

My problem with such issues is very practical. In my time in America, I will say that the Caucasians I have met have generally been nice and welcoming. Blacks too of course. But let's just focus on someone who has posted on this issue on the Reformation 21 blog: Leon Brown. Leon was my senior in WSCal back when I began my first year. He was extremely vocal about many things, but one particular episode stuck in my memory: There was a time when there was some discussions between him and some of the other freshmen or something, and a question I asked him was ignored. For some reason, despite the fact that sometimes the two of us were in the same place or event, we did not talk. Now, I am not saying that he was intentionally antagonistic towards me, and I don't bear a grudge, but I'm bringing this up merely to illustrate one simple point.

Now, I understand there might be reasons, some even legitimate, that might cause some blacks or minorities to build up resentment and anger towards the dominant white majority. While I do not want to discount that, I find it strange that none of them ever shine the light upon themselves. My example of Leon Brown is to show that he himself did not seem to act according to his idea of equality. Just like this episode involving a black pastor, I find it strange that people do not think that blacks can be racist. I mean, when they express their outrage, my question is: Are they truly against racism, or are they only against racism because they are the victims? After all, we have seen throughout history what happens when the oppressed turn the tables against their oppressors: they oppress their former masters. Likewise, are they only against racism when they are the victims, while they have no trouble with racism IF they become the dominant race?

As I have said, I have found the Caucasians I have interacted with nice and welcoming, in general. I have no problems with many of those of other ethnicities also. Unfortunately, using Leon as an example here, I could have said that Caucasians in general are more welcoming towards me. Do I therefore cry "racist" if a black person slights me? Oh, but that wasn't his intention, but isn't that the PRECISE issue? Is it the intention, or the feeling of being slighted, that counts, when all the rage start boiling out? What if I were to start nursing any slights, real or perceived, that others of other ethnicities, have "committed" against me? If a white person were to offend me, I will chalk it to ALL whites. If a black person were to offend me, then can I chalk it up to all blacks as being anti-Chinese? I should hope not! But why not?

"They" want "equal treatment." You know, it would be helpful when they actually practice equal treatment - to "Asians" and whites too. When black pastors like Bryan Crawford Loritts can stop playing the race card to defend the heretic T.D. Jakes, that would be a real marked improvement.

P.S.: I have addressed real racists before, for example here. Cado Odac is a true white racist. The issue here is not whether individual racists exist, but the sweeping charge of systematic racism and the ungodly bitterness within certain segments of the black and minority populace (note: I did not say "community," because it overgeneralizes and categorizes people according to what they supposedly are).

11 comments:

Gregory S. Gill said...

I am black, and I agree with you. In schools in the USA blacks are violent towards Asians. Black intellectuals like Thomas Sowell, and Walter Williams, write very good works on this race issue, and others as well.

Jenson Lim said...

Having lived in the UK for 17 years, I can empathise. One has to be thick-skinned and not to be too sensitive. Quite often, it is just people being unable to relate to other races.

Well, you have a choice or either getting on with pastoral work in the US or going back. If the former, you would have to cope with your feelings.

PuritanReformed said...

@Greg,

that's interesting.

PuritanReformed said...

@Jenson

True, it's more the inability to relate and hyper-sensitivity.

I don't know what I have written that implies I was affected as to my feelings. What I was stating are just hypothetical questions. I harbor no grievances towards any particular ethnicity, and I don't feel antagonistic towards Leon Brown.

Jenson Lim said...

That's good to know.

Gregory S. Gill said...

I very, very highly recommend to all the works of Thomas Sowell, and Walter Williams on the race, and ethnicity issues. Very few have reach their very high level in dealing with the race, and ethnicity issues both in America, and around the world as well.

Gregory S. Gill said...

Thomas Sowell works can be seen here: http://www.tsowell.com/

and

http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/sowell1.asp

Walter Williams works can be seen here: http://econfaculty.gmu.edu/wew/

and

http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/williams1.asp

Gregory S. Gill said...

A very good book on the racial issue is Jason Riley's new book "Please Stop Helping Us". By all means get it for all who are interested in the race issue, its at Amazon.

PuritanReformed said...

@Greg,

interesting. Thanks.

Jon Sorensen said...

Hi,

I'm just wandering why racism is sin? Where is this in the Bible?

PuritanReformed said...

@Jon,

racism says that someone of another race is inferior to e.g. the white "race." It states that somehow one race is ontologically inferior to another, which is an attack on the Imago Dei. When acted on, racism becomes a violation of the command to love one's neighbor as oneself.